The TarHelium
   Volume 39, Issue 1                                                                                                   September 2008

 Nicolle S. Tulve,
Editor

 Judi Price,
Copy Editor

 M. Pasquinelli,
Secretary
& Address Information

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NCACS
EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE

  J. Brown, Chair
  J. Hines, Chair-Elect
  M. Pasquinelli, Secretary
  J. T. Bursey, Treasurer

 

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The TarHelium is a publication of the North Carolina Section of the American Chemical Society.
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NC ACS DINNER MEETING

SEPTEMBER 16, 2008
Mez Mexican Restaurant, RTP
4:00 - 8:00 pm

Open to non-members and members

Speaker: Dr. Ned Heindl
     "Tinctures, Tonics and Patent Medicines - A History of Commercialized Quackery"

Abstract:

While folk medicines and natural product derivatives have, in many cases, proven a fruitful source of modern, medically accepted therapeutics, they have also proven an abundant source for quackery. From Dr. Bateman's Pectoral Drops, recommended for "rheumatism, afflictions of the stone, gravel agues, the hysterics", to Munyon's Miracle Kidney Cure, which was claimed to "cure Bright's disease, all urinary problems, and pain in the back and groins from kidney diseases", the 19th century witnessed nearly unbelievable excesses in pharmaceutical advertising. Beginning in colonial America and extending to the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act, a plethora of quack pharmaceutical manufacturers produced and aggressively marketed home remedies of dubious origin and questionable chemical purity. Whether the ingredients were opium and ethanol or simple milk sugar, no regulations governed their manufacture or sale. Dr. Heindel will trace the birth of America's patent medicine industry in the late 18th century and its heyday of unregulated commercial success in the 19th century. The role of chemistry in the production, analysis, and eventual legal regulation of patent medicines will also be treated.

More information to be posted on the NC ACS Local Section website.

Fall 2008 NC ACS LOCAL SECTION MEETING

Tuesday, October 28, 2008
5:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Hamner Conference Center
NC Biotechnology Center
15 T.W. Alexander Drive
Research Triangle Park, NC

The Fall meeting will feature posters (with hors d'oeuves), Awards (Marcus Hobbs Service, NC ACS Distinguished Speaker), and other topics of interest to NC ACS members and chemists in our local Section area.

Draft Agenda:

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm Poster setup, mix & mingle
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Posters and Poster Judging, hors d'oeuves and refreshments, mix & mingle
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Presentation of Awards (Marcus Hobbs, NC ACS Distinguished Speaker, and Others) and NC ACS Distinguished Speaker Presentation

Meeting Registration:

Pre-registration Onsite
Regular, $20 $30
Student, $10 $15
There is no cost to students who submit research posters.

The 2008 Marcus Hobbs Award will be presented to Dr. Joan T. Bursey. Dr. Bursey has served the NC ACS Section for more than 20 years, most of that time as its Treasurer.

The 2008 NC ACS Distinguished Speaker Award will be presented to
Dr. Michael Crimmins, UNC, Chair, Department of Chemistry.

A Call for Posters will be emailed to the NC ACS membership, local Universities, and other interested parties in the near future. Student posters will be judged to compete for Cash Awards of $300, $200, and $100 (1st - 3rd place, respectively). In addition, all students submitting a poster receive a complementary registration to the Section Meeting.


2008 Marcus E. Hobbs Award Recipient Named

Joan Tesarek (Te-SAR'-rek) Bursey grew up in Omaha, Nebraska, where she received her bachelor's degree in chemistry and mathematics from Creighton University in 1965. She earned her Ph.D. in 1969 from the University of California - Berkeley (once or twice she caught the exquisite pleasure of drifting tear gas there during that interesting period) in the field of mass spectrometry. She has one of the few Ph.D. diplomas around signed by a President of the United States -- Ronald Reagan was governor of California at the time she got her Ph.D. and diplomas were signed by the California governor, who later went on to become President of the US!! She came to UNC as Maurice Bursey's postdoc in mid-1969, and they were married at the end of 1970. Her name was changed in galley proofs of an article in JACS, which caused international replies (Fred McLafferty said, "I know you're supposed to find good permanent positions for your students, but this is farther than most of us would go".) and some years later occasioned a poster at a symposium on strange occurrences sponsored by the Division of the History of Chemistry entitled "A Wedding Announcement in JACS". We even saw students taking notes from the poster!

After the university's current anti-nepotism policy did not permit a renewal of her contract, she worked with David Rosenthal and Edo Pellizzari in the RTI mass spectrometry center. Later she took a position at Radian Corporation's laboratory on Airport Boulevard, becoming a well-respected expert in environmental testing and analysis. When Radian was purchased by Dow and the federal government saw a conflict in a Dow lab's continuing its contract work with EPA, the laboratory was purchased by Eastern Research Group, until then a company of meeting facilitators and economists in Massachusetts. She added to her national and international stature there until the Bush Administration's quiet strangling of the EPA budget caused ERG's contract not to be renewed and there was a reduction in their staff by more than half. Currently, she works in a program for seniors at the EPA facility in Research Triangle Park.

Joan has a long list of publications in mass spectrometry, and an even longer one in environmental analysis. She is much sought after as a speaker at EPA gatherings and has been a consultant to the government of the Philippines in her specialty.


2008 NC ACS Distinguished Speaker Award

Michael Crimmins was born in E. St. Louis, Illinois on January 3, 1954. He received his B.A. degree from Hendrix College (1976) and his Ph.D. from Duke (1980), where he worked on synthetic applications of intermolecular photochemical cycloadditions under the direction of Professor Steven W. Baldwin. He was a postdoctoral associate at the California Institute of Technology working with Professor David A. Evans from 1980-81. He joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1981 as Assistant Professor of Chemistry. He was subsequently promoted to Associate Professor (1988) and Professor (1993). In 2001 he was named George and Alice Welsh Distinguished Term Professor and assumed the position of Mary Ann Smith Distinguished Professor in January 2003. He is currently Chair of the Department of Chemistry at UNC.

Professor Crimmins' research interests are in the development of new synthetic methods and their application to the total synthesis of biologically active compounds. A variety of new synthetic methods have been developed in his laboratories including stereoselective intramolecular photochemical cycloadditions, asymmetric aldol addition reactions of chlorotitanium enolates, tandem conjugate addition-cyclization reactions, radical fragmentation and rearrangement reactions, methods for spiroketal synthesis, and ring closing metathesis of medium rings. His research group has completed the total synthesis of more than thirty architecturally complex natural products.

Professor Crimmins' research has been recognized by a number of awards. Included in these is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship in 1986. In 1994 he was awarded an American Cyanamid Faculty Fellowship, was recipient of an Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award from the American Chemical Society in 2001 and received the Charles H. Herty Medal from the Georgia Section of the American Chemical Society in 2004. In addition, he received a university wide teaching award, the Tanner Faculty Award for Excellence in Undergraduate teaching in 1999. He is currently a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry and a member of the scientific advisory board of Chimerix, Inc.


Enantioselective Synthesis of Heterocyclic Natural Products
Michael T. Crimmins, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC

Abstract:

Nature produces a stunning collection of topologically fascinating and biologically relevant structures as secondary metabolites. These interesting structures provide a unique testing ground for new reactions and strategies for the enantioselective construction of carbon-carbon bonds. Recent advances in the use of asymmetric enolate methods and novel strategies for the construction of various natural products will be described. In particular, novel methods for the production of cyclic ethers with stereogenic centers at each of the carbons flanking the ether oxygen will be described. Strategies based on asymmetric aldol and alkylation reactions will be presented with an emphasis on their utility in the synthesis of polyketides, polyethers, and other secondary marine metabolites.


CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS!!!!!

Volunteer to help out at the State Fair (October 16 - October 26). For more information and to sign up, please contact Bill Switzer at bill_switzer@ncsu.edu.

For more information checkout the State Fair website at:

http://www.ncstatefair.org/2008//


SERMACS 2008

Mark your calendar now for SERMACS 2008 �Living and Working in a Material World� to be held at Music City Sheraton Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee on November 12-15, 2008. Check the website for complete details:

http://www.sermacs2008.org/

Scheduled Workshops:

  • Safety Workshop - Wednesday Afternoon, 1-5.
  • Legislative Affairs Workshop - Thursday Afternoon, 1-5.
  • ACS Career Workshops - Friday 8 am-12:30 pm, George O'Neill, Presenter
  • Involving Volunteers - Friday Afternoon, 1-5
  • Hands on Chemistry with Vernier - Friday Afternoon, 1-5.


ACS 42nd WESTERN REGIONAL MEETING 2008

The Changing Face of Chemistry in the 21st Century
http://membership.acs.org/w/WRM2008

September 24-27, 2008

Riviera Hotel and Casino
2901 Las Vegas Blvd S
Las Vegas, Nevada

HOSTED BY:

Southern Nevada Local Section
Two Year College Chemistry Consortium (2YC3)

Daily Schedule: Click here for a tentative schedule of events.

Lodging:

    The WRM 08 will convene at the Riviera Hotel and Convention Center in Las Vegas, NV. Special conference room rates of $129.00 per night for a regular single or double room are available. Petite Suites at $175.00 per night, Bedroom Suites at $300.00 and $400.00 per night, and Bedroom Penthouses at $550.00 and $700.00 per night are also available. The special rates apply for two days prior to the meeting and/or three days after the meeting for those who wish to take advantage of the many things to see and do in Las Vegas and environs. If registering by phone (702-734-5110) please identify yourself as attending the American Chemical Society Western Regional Meeting to obtain the special room rate. On-line registration is open, but sign up before September 5.

Shake, Rattle and Roll:

    No, not Elvis, but the Atomic Testing Museum. A breakfast and tour of the Atomic Testing Museum, the morning of September 24 will get attendees energized for the meeting. UNLV Professor and State Senator, Dr. Dina Titus, author of Bombs in the Backyard, will provide commentary on this important aspect of our 20th century history.

Registration" On-line registration for the WRM and the Special Events is open

Award Symposia:

  • Arthur C. Cope Award
  • ACS Division of Chemical Education Award for Excellence in High School Teaching
  • Annual Committee Chair Certificate
  • The E. Ann Nalley ACS Western Regional Meeting Award of Excellence

Special Events :

  • Meet and Greet -- Tuesday evening, September 23, 2008 Meet President-Elect Dr.Thomas Lane
  • Breakfast Kick Off at the Atomic Testing Museum -- Wednesday morning
  • Exposition Opening and Reception -- Wednesday afternoon
  • Women Chemists Committee Luncheon -- Thursday - with speaker Dr. Dina Titus
  • Awards Banquet -- Thursday - with speaker ACS President Dr. Bruce Bursten
  • Career Services Workshop -- Thursday
  • Leadership Development System Courses -- Friday - �Leading Change� and �Innovation�
  • Ice Cream Opening Social (Education Program) -- Friday
  • Two Year College Chemistry Consortium Banquet -- Friday
  • Educational Awards Luncheon -- Saturday

Call for Papers:

    The deadline for submission of abstracts is August 4. Visit our website at: http://membership.acs.org/w/WRM2008 or just go to Google and type in WRM 2008 for access to details, registration and submission of abstracts.

    The symposia topics encompass:

  • RADIOCHEMISTRY AND RADIATION DETECTION

    Radiochemistry in the advanced nuclear fuel cycle
    Organizer: Ken Czerwinski (czerwin2@unlv.nevada.edu)
    UNLV Department of Chemistry and Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies

    Nuclear forensics, chemical techniques
    Organizer: Ralf Sudowe (ralf.sudowe@unlv.edu), UNLV Department of Health Physics

    Techniques for the detection of fissile materials and nuclear waste in transportation scenarios
    Organizer: Steve Curtis (sszjcurtis@att.net), Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies

    Counting atoms and decays: measurements and applications in environmental radiochemistry
    Organizer: Mike Ketterer (michael.ketterer@nau.edu)
    Northern Arizona University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

  • FUTURE ENERGY SOURCES AND MATERIAL SCIENCE

    New developments in biofuels research
    Organizers: Oliver Hemmers (hemmers@unlv.nevada.edu)
    UNLV Department of Chemistry and Office of Strategic Energy Programs
    Dr. Kristina Lipinska-Kalita (lipinska@unlv.nevada.edu), UNLV Chemistry

    Chemistry of biofuels
    Organizers: Oliver Hemmers (hemmers@unlv.nevada.edu)
    UNLV Department of Chemistry and Office of Strategic Energy Programs
    Dr. Kristina Lipinska-Kalita (lipinska@unlv.nevada.edu), UNLV Chemistry

    Chemistry, materials science, and geoscience at high pressures
    Organizer: Malcolm Nicol (nicol@physics.unlv.edu)
    UNLV Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics and Astronomy

    Materials for renewable energy applications
    Organizer: Clemens Heske (clemens.heske@unlv.edu), UNLV Department of Chemistry

    Electrochemistry: materials and applications
    Organizer: UNLV Department of Chemistry

    Lab-on-a-chip technology: microfluidics/nanofluidics, for chemical and biochemical applications
    Organizer: Shizhi Qian (shizhi.qian@unlv.edu), UNLV Department of Mechanical Engineering

  • BIOMEDICAL AND CANCER RESEARCH

    Medicinal chemistry in cancer drug development
    Organizers: Ron Fiscus (rfiscus@nvcancer.org), Nevada Cancer Institute
    Ron Gary (ronald.gary@unlv.edu), UNLV Department of Chemistry

    Proteomics in cancer research
    Organizers: Ron Gary(ronald.gary@unlv.edu), UNLV Department of Chemistry
    Ron Fiscus (rfiscus@nvcancer.org), Nevada Cancer Institute

    Biodefense and emerging pathogen
    Organizer: Ernesto Abel-Santos (ernesto.abelsantos@unlv.edu), UNLV Department of Chemistry

  • ORGANIC CHEMISTRY/NATURAL PRODUCTS/POLYMERS

    General organic chemistry: synthesis and mechanisms
    Organizer: Gordon Gribble (ggribble@dartmouth.edu)
    Dartmouth College Department of Chemistry

    Polymer architecture
    Organizer: Pradip Bhowmik (pradip.bhowmik@unlv.edu), UNLV Department of Chemistry

    Sand and sea natural products
    Organizers:
    William Fenical (wfenical@ucsd.edu), Scripps Institution of Oceanography
    University of California, San Diego

    Leslie Gunatilaka (leslieg@ag.arizona.edu), University of Arizona
    Southwest Center for Natural Products Research and Commercialization

  • ENVIRONMENTAL/WATER RESEARCH

    Water resources management in the U.S. southwest
    Organizer: Lambis Papelis (lambis.papelis@dri.edu)
    Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas and UNLV Water Resources Management

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products in drinking water and surface waters
    Organizers: Lantis I. Osemwengie (osemwengie.lantis@epa.gov), USEPA, Las Vegas
    Wayne Sovocool (sovocool.wayne@epa.gov), USEPA, Las Vegas

    Perchlorates and emerging contaminants in water
    Organizer: Jacimaria Batista (jaci@ce.unlv.edu)
    UNLV Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Sampling and determination of nanoparticles in the environment
    Organizer: Edward M. Heithmar (heithmar.ed@epa.gov), USEPA, Las Vegas

    Advances in environmental analysis
    Organizers: Georges-Marie Momplaisir (momplaisir.georges-marie@epa.gov), USEPA, Las Vegas
    Charlita Rosal (rosal.charlita@epa.gov), USEPA, Las Vegas

    Recent investigations of rock varnish and related natural surfaces
    Organizer: Kimberly R. Kuhlman (kuhlman@psi.edu), Planetary Science Institute Tucson, AZ

    Rapid analytical methods to determine contaminants in food
    Organizer: Samuel Godefroy (samuel_godefroy@hc-sc.gc.ca), Health Canada, Ottawa

    Mercury, lead, arsenic, chromium, and other contaminants in the environment and in consumer products
    Organizer: Paul T. Gremillion (paul.gremillion@nau.edu), Northern Arizona University
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Nanotechnology, Research, Applications and Exposure Issues
    Organizers:
    Jeanette Van Emon  (vanemon.jeanette@epa.gov)
    Office of Research & Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    David W. Emerson (emerson@unlv.nevada.edu), UNLV Department of Chemistry

  • SPECIAL SESSIONS

    Chemical forensics
    Organizer: Michael Stypa (m8652s@lvmpd.com), Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department

    Microwave assisted extraction methods & applications – A tribute to Werner F. Beckert
    Organizer: Viorica Lopez Avila (viorica_lopez-avila@agilent.com)
    Agilent Technologies, Palo Alto

    Challenges to science in the 21st century: Women as leaders
    Organizers: Ann Nalley (annn@cameron.edu)
    Cameron University, Department of Physical Sciences, Oklahoma
    Jeanette Van Emon (vanemon.jeanette@epa.gov), USEPA, Las Vegas

    Division of Small Chemical Business (SCHB): Case Histories, Success Stories, and How to Get Started
    Organizer: Joseph E. Sabol (info@chem-consult.com)

  • POSTER SESSION (Open for all areas of chemistry and biochemistry.)

    Poster Session (Open for all areas of chemistry and biochemistry.)
    Organizer: Vernon Hodge (hodgev@unlv.nevada.edu), UNLV Department of Chemistry

    VENUE: All General Poster Sessions will be held in the Royale Pavilion 2-4 Exposition area and the Chemical Education Poster Session in Capri 112/113 at the Riviera Hotel.

    DATES AND TIMES FOR POSTER SESSIONS:

    SESSION NUMBER 1, GENERAL POSTERS
    WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24TH, ROYALE PAVILION 2-4 EXPOSITION AREA
    • Poster setup: 2 – 5 PM
    • Posters on display: 5 - 7 PM
    • Presenter(s) available: 5:30 – 6:30 PM
    • Poster removal: After 7 PM. Posters may remain up until noon Thursday.

    SESSION NUMBER 2, GENERAL POSTERS
    THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25th, ROYALE PAVILION 2-4 EXPOSITION AREA
    • Poster setup: 12 – 2 PM
    • Posters on display: 2 - 7 PM
    • Presenter(s) available: 5:30 – 6:30 PM
    • Poster removal: After 7 PM. Posters may remain up until noon Friday.

    SESSION NUMBER 3, CHEMICAL EDUCATION POSTERS
    SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27TH, CAPRI 112/113
    • Undergraduate students from both 4-yr universities/colleges and 2-yr colleges, as well as secondary teachers.
    • Poster setup: 8 – 8:30 AM
    • Posters on display: 8:30 AM – 12 PM
    • Presenter(s) available: 10 AM –12 PM
    • Poster removal: 12 – 12:30 PM.

    POSTER PRESENTERS: Remember that you must be registered to attend the 2008 ACS Western Regional Meeting!

  • CHEMICAL EDUCATION (including an ice cream social and a poster session for undergraduate students and teachers)

CHEMICAL EDUCATION

see also Education Program

Education poster session – Undergraduate chemistry research
Organizer: MaryKay Orgill (marykay.orgill@unlv.edu), UNLV Department of Chemistry

Education poster session – Secondary teacher research and best practices
Organizer: Kent Crippen (kcrippen@unlv.nevada.edu)
UNLV Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Chemistry in Context – Environmental and forensic chemistry
Organizer: Ellen Ebert (ekebert@interact.ccsd.net)
Clark County School District, Las Vegas

Teaching AP chemistry
Organizer: Ellen Ebert (kcrippen@unlv.nevada.edu) Clark County School District, Las Vegas

Using technology in the chemistry classroom
Organizer: Kent Crippen (kcrippen@unlv.nevada.edu)
UNLV Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Best practices and best activities in secondary chemistry
Organizer: Ellen Ebert (ekebert@interact.ccsd.net) Clark County School District, Las Vegas

Best practices and best activities in tertiary chemistry
Organizer: MaryKay Orgill (marykay.orgill@unlv.edu) UNLV Department of Chemistry

A symposium organized by Prof. Clemens Heske entitled Materials for Renewable Energy Applications is especially timely. Confirmed invited speakers and their topics are:

  • Todd Deutsch (National Renewable Energy Laboratory): "Thin-Film Nitride Semiconductors for Photoelectrolysis "

  • Jinghua Guo (Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab): "Photon-in/photon-out soft-x-ray spectroscopy in characterization of bandgap engineered solar nanomaterials"

  • Marcus Baer (UNLV): �Spectroscopic characterization of thin films used in energy conversion devices�

  • Tom Jaramillo (Stanford University): �Designing non-noble metal electrocatalysts: An investigation of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER)�

  • Dong-Chan Lee (UNLV): "Functional organogel of asymmetric bisphenazine"

  • Bilge Yildiz (Massachusetts Institute of Technology): "Reversible Solid Oxide Electrocatalytic Cells for Co-generation of Hydrogen / Syn-Gas, and Electricity"

  • Yufeng Zhang (UNLV): "Spectroscopic characterization of catalysts for PEM fuel cells�

Another symposium, Challenges to Science in the 21st Century: Women as Leaders, has been organized by 2006 ACS President E. Ann Nalley and Dr. Jeanette Van Emon. In addition to Dr. Nalley, speakers include 2008 ACS Board Members Bonnie Carpenter, Janan Hays, and Marinda Wu. Dr. Keith Vitense, Councilor from the Wichita Falls Duncan Section will discuss mentoring. Dr. Kathleen O�Leary Havelka, Global Business Manager for Lubrizol will be the featured speaker at the Women Chemists Committee Luncheon on Thursday.

Contact Information


Complete details of the Meeting can be printed from the attached pdf file. Western Regional Meeting Information Flyer


ACS SHORT COURSE CIRCUIT - DURHAM, NC

September 29 - October 3, 2008

Registration has opened for the American Chemical Society Short Course Circuit to be held in Durham, NC, September 29 - October 3, 2008.

The following courses are being offered at this circuit:

  • Chemical Engineering for Chemists, September 29-30
  • Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics: Principles and Applications in Pre-Clinical Drug Development, September 29-30
  • Drug-like Properties in Drug Discovery, September 29-30
  • Essentials of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology, September 29-30
  • Toxicology: Principles and Applications, September 30 - October 1*
  • Process Research in the Pharmaceutical Industry, October 1-2
  • Methods Development, Validation Procedures, and Conformity Assessment in the Analytical Laboratory, October 1-2
  • Statistical Analysis of Laboratory Data, October 1-3
  • Laboratory Safety and Health, October 1-3
  • Effective Technical Writing, October 2-3
  • Chemical and Biological Mechanisms in Toxicology, October 2-3*
* Save $400 off the total registration fee if you enroll for both Toxicology: Principles and Applications, and Chemical and Biological Mechanisms in Toxicology.

For over 30 years, ACS Continuing Education has been a respected source for chemists who wish to advance or update their skills. We offer courses and webcasts on a variety of topics throughout the year, and in a number of locations. Please visit us online at www.acs.org/shortcourses to see everything we have to offer, or contact us at 1-800-227-5558 X4508 or via email at shortcourses@acs.org.


NATIONAL CHEMISTRY WEEK

2008 Theme: "Having a Ball with Chemistry"
(October 19 - 25th, 2008)

National Chemistry Week (NCW) is a community-based annual event that unites ACS local sections, businesses, schools, and individuals in communicating the importance of chemistry to our quality of life.

Watch the NC Museum of Life and Sciences website (http://www.ncmls.org/visit/events) for more information on National Chemistry Week activities.

CALLING ALL VOLUNTEERS!!!!!!

The "Chemistry Day" event is scheduled for Sat, Oct 18 from 10:00 am - 3:00 pm at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences. The theme for this year is �Having a Ball with Chemistry" so we are looking for volunteers who would be willing to set up a display/demo related to the theme, if possible. Since this is an Olympic year, this theme was selected by the ACS and the focus is chemistry as it pertains to sports. We are also looking for volunteers who would like to share career information (so if anyone would like to display info about their industry, that would be great, too)! Interested volunteers should contact Meredith Storms via email at meredith.storms@uncp.edu or phone at 910-521-6427.


COMING SOON - LOCAL SECTION ELECTIONS!!

Our Local Section elections will be coming up this Fall and there are presently four (4) positions to be filled: Chair-Elect, Treasurer, Alternate Councilor and Councilor.

The Nominating Committee will be proposing a slate for these positions; this is a call for nominations "from the floor."

Any active member may nominate themselves or any other active member for any of the positions noted. Please: if you nominate another person, ensure that he/she is willing to be nominated and, if elected, serve in the position noted.

The duties of each of these positions can be found on our Section website at:

http://membership.acs.org/N/Ncarolina/job_manual.html
.

NOTE: These positions are for multiple year terms and the Chair-Elect for 2009 will be the Chair in 2010.

To submit your nomination, email Sol Levine at naturpix@mindspring.com not later than October 1, 2008.


NC ACS Local Section Participation at the NBC17 Health and Fitness Fair and Polar Palooza Events

The NBC 17 Health and Fitness Fair on May 17 and 18 drew large crowds and seemed to be well received. There were 11 volunteers over the two-day period, including: Darrell Coleman, Jim Ellenson, John Holland, David Houck, Ken Krebs, Sol Levine, Ken Lyle, Richard Palmer, Craig Stanton, Bill Switzer, and Alan Tonelli. David Houck was a first time volunteer. The demonstrations focused mostly on states of matter and density as a property of the states of matter. They were the same as those normally done at the state fair, which includes activities with liquid nitrogen and dry ice, as well as making coffee filter butterflies. Feedback from the volunteers noted that we did not have a very strong connection between our exhibit and the theme of health and fitness. The only activity that might be marginally connected is the Coke/Diet Coke sinking/floating experiment which shows the difference in the amount of sugar. Another that we could have done was to show that iron in cereal is metallic iron.

There were fewer people who attended the Polar Palooza event at the NC Museum of Natural Science, but those who did attend seemed very interested in the activities. A number of visitors spent a long time talking to volunteers. There were 9 volunteers, including: Michelle Arnold, Con McCormick, Richard Palmer, Karin Pihel, Ghada Rabah, Susan Roweton, Bill Switzer, Pete Vandeberg, and Jeff Whittaker. Of those, 3 were first time volunteers: Michelle, Ghada, and Susan. This event focused on the effects of global warming on polar regions, which gave us an opportunity to develop a whole new set of demonstrations focusing on unusual properties of ice. We had demonstrations showing that glaciers which either melt or break off into the polar oceans raise sea level, but that ice which is already in the ocean does not change sea level as it melts. We also showed that ice in the ocean melts at a lower temperature than ice on land, which says that if polar regions warm uniformly, oceans should melt before glaciers. In addition we showed that one consequence of global warming might be increased evaporation from warmer polar oceans that could drastically increase precipitation on polar continents and, therefore, possibly cause glaciers to rebuild. We did several demonstrations that did not support the stated hypothesis. We acknowledged that experiments always work, but experimental designs are not always correct. One of these demonstrations attempted to show that an atmosphere high in CO2 warms more than one low in CO2 by trapping more infrared radiation. Another attempted to show that water freezes, not solutions; hence ice that freezes from an ocean is water ice not salt water ice. Also it would be nice to show in a dramatic way that ice melts under pressure. The exhibit at Polar Palooza was especially successful.

The next opportunity to volunteer for public outreach comes in the fall. The State Fair for 2008 starts at 3 PM, Thursday, October 16 - Sunday, October 26. Note that the fair opens on the afternoon, one day earlier than usual. The theme for the fair is "Take Time for a Great Time" and the title of the exhibition in which we participate will change this year to "Green North Carolina". This topic opens up a chance for the ACS to fit more closely than ever to the theme of the exhibition. The State Fair organizers look at the ACS as a model of exhibitors who draw large crowds, but they would also like to see us relate as closely to the theme as possible.

In addition to the State Fair, Saturday, October 18 has been set aside at the NC Museum of Natural Science for celebrating National Chemistry Week. On this day we will again have numerous tables set up with activities for museum visitors. We will also do several stage shows during the day. The theme of National Chemistry Week this year is "Having a Ball with Chemistry". The theme is intended to relate to 2008 being an Olympic year. A web search on "2008 National Chemistry Week" should provide a link to activities and resources planned by the ACS. The NC Museum of Natural Science does a good job publicizing the National Chemistry Week activities so that we always draw large crowds. Because of the direct overlap with the NC State Fair, we will be strapped for volunteers, so please look for opportunities to volunteer that will be announced through the NC Section listservers and on the web page:

http://membership.acs.org/N/NCarolina/.

Anyone who has ideas for demonstrations that might relate to any of the themes 1) health and fitness, 2) global warming or 3) Green North Carolina, please send them to: bill_switzer@ncsu.edu.


LOCAL SECTION DISCUSSION GROUPS!!

Information on the NC ACS Local Section Discussion Groups can be found at the following web link:
http://membership.acs.org/N/NCarolina/Discussion_Groups.htm.

Discussion groups include:

        

Check them out and consider joining a discussion group.


PROJECT SEED PROGRAM

This year marks the 40th anniversary of Project SEED. The Project SEED program is a statewide, year-round science enrichment program. �The goals of the program are to financially support and encourage talented, disadvantaged North Carolina high school students to pursue terminal graduate and professional school degrees in chemistry, or chemistry-related science disciplines through a scientific research internship experience. �Students participating in Project SEED are placed in academic, industrial, and governmental laboratories for 8-10 weeks during the summer to conduct research under the mentorship of accomplished scientists.

Project SEED is a program developed by the American Chemical Society to encourage economically disadvantaged high school students to pursue careers in the chemical sciences by providing a comprehensive internship in scientific research. The Project SEED director in North Carolina is Kenneth Cutler.
Mr. Ken Cutler, Director of Project SEED, with Ms. Isa Watson a graduate of the program  

Since 1968, the program has made it possible for more than 4,500 disadvantaged high school students to conduct research in chemistry laboratories.

Student applicants must have at least one of the following criteria for admission into the program:

  • Low income
  • Underrepresented minorities in science
  • Low performing schools
  • First generation to go to college

Participating universities are: Duke University, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and NC State University. Last year more than 200 students applied to the program and only 40 were selected to participate in Project SEED.

Burroughs Wellcome Fund grant largely covers the costs of the program which run about $250,000 a year. In addition, each student receives a stipend to offset the loss of a summer job.

This August 17-21, in Philadelphia, a symposium will highlight the history of Project SEED, and former participants will offer their recollections of the program. Recent Project SEED students will present their posters during Sci-Mix. The Committee will also recognize long-time mentors and coordinators, who volunteer countless hours of their time and are crucial to the success of the program.

For more information regarding PROJECT SEED, contact Ken Cutler at:

ncprojectseed@thehamner.org


SEMINAR SCHEDULES FOR THE LOCAL UNIVERSITIES

Duke University Department of Chemistry Seminar Schedule:
For complete details and updates, check the online activity calendar at
http://www.chem.duke.edu/

Duke University Department of Biochemistry Seminar Schedule:
For complete details and updates, check the online activity calendar at

http://www.biochem.duke.edu/department/seminar-schedule

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Chemistry Seminar Schedule:
For complete details and updates, check the online activity calendar at

http://asp.chem.unc.edu/calendar/seminar.asp

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics Seminar Schedule:
For complete details and updates, check the online activity calendar at

http://www.med.unc.edu/biochem/events

North Carolina State University Department of Chemistry Seminar Schedule:
For complete details and updates, check the online activity calendar at

http://www.ncsu.edu/chemistry/seminarfall2008.html

North Carolina State University Department of Biochemistry Seminar Schedule:
For complete details and updates, check the online activity calendar at

http://biochem.ncsu.edu/seminar.php


SERMACS 2012

We will be bidding to host the SERMACS meeting in 2012. We are looking for hard-working, energetic individuals who would like to participate on the organizing committee. If you are interested, please contact one of the Executive Committee members who can provide you with more information. Thank you!!


Chemistry Olympiad!!

Three hundred and eighty students took the local Chemistry Olympiad exam for 2008, and 15 were selected from 8 schools to take the National exam, which includes the lab. Of the 15, one scored high honors and two scored honors. The high honors student was invited to participate in the study camp, but turned it down because he would have had to miss graduation and he was the valedictorian. For more information on the Chemistry Olympiad, contact:
    Myra Halpin
    270 Spider Web Lane
    Pittsboro, NC 27312.


NC ACS 2008 Undergraduate Scholarship Awards

The Scholarship Committee of the North Carolina Section of the American Chemical Society has selected the 2008 undergraduate scholarship recipients. The $1,500 awards will be used to help fund chemistry research through the purchase of laboratory reagents and materials. The award recipients were:

Sarah Beth McSpadden

    Campbell University
    Advisor: Dr. W. Lin Coker III
    Research Focus: Assessment of lead content in everyday objects

Eric Emilio-Gerrit Butter

    University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill)
    Dual enrollment at Duke University (Robertson Scholar)
    Research Advisor: Dr. Russ Mumper
    Research focus: Development of novel methods to overcome resistance of infectious microbes and viruses

Congratulations to the award winners and to all of the students who submitted applications! For further information regarding future NC ACS undergraduate scholarship awards, please contact Keith Levine (levine@rti.org) for application instructions.


Myra Halpin, Ph.D., Wins Outstanding Educator Award in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education from the SMT Center

--contact Lisa Rhoades
919-991-5111

RTP, N.C. � The first annual SMT Awards were presented at the SMT Celebration on Saturday, April 19 in Cary, N.C. Sam Houston, President and CEO of the North Carolina Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education Center (SMT Center), was on hand to announce the awards.

The Outstanding Educator Award in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education was given to Myra Halpin, Ph.D. Halpin, a chemistry teacher at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics in Durham, N.C., has received numerous teaching awards in the past, including the NC Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science, Sigma Xi teaching awards and many others. She was selected as one of NASAs Teachers in Space.

She has partnered with Duke University to produce education modules that provide students with an opportunity to learn and apply concepts from chemistry and biology using topics from pharmacology. �Dr. Halpin�s commitment to improving not only her teaching, but the teaching practice of hundreds of other teachers is the reason we decided to give her this award� said Houston Other awards given at the ceremony included: The Partnership Award in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education was shared with The Granville Education Foundation Technology Committee, and Shodor; The Champion of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education Award was given to J. Donald Cline; The Business and Industry Award in Science, Mathematics and Technology Education was given to GlaxoSmithKline; and The Student Leadership Award of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education was given to Adam Meyer, a senior at Raleigh Charter High School.

For additional details and video, visit the SMT website at http://www.ncsmt.org/newsletter.php?action=Detail&id=324&categoryid=3


About the SMT Center

Founded in 2002, the SMT Center promotes and supports innovation in science, mathematics, and technology learning. Focusing on North Carolina�s elementary and secondary schools, the SMT Center works to provide all children in North Carolina with the necessary knowledge and skills to have successful careers, be good citizens and advance the economy of the state. For more information about the SMT Center, please see the website: www.ncsmt.org.


WELCOME TO OUR NEW NC ACS LOCAL SECTION MEMBERS!


DAVID M. FREEHLING
XIANGYANG WU
AZADEH LALEHZARI
RUSLAN PRYADUN
CARA L. NYGREN
QUNZHAO WANG
RAMASUBBU JEYARAMAN
PRADYUMNA KUMAR NAMDEV
ROXANNE R. ADAMS
ILYA A. BALABIN
MORTON A. BARLAZ
MICHAEL J. BARRETT
WILEY F. BETTS
SONJA S. CAPRACOTTA
MARY J. CARROLL
RAMAMURTY V. CHANGALVALA
MARCUS A. CHEEK
YUMING M. CHEN
QIANG CHEN
BROOKE E. CHRISTIAN
KATHLEEN W. CLANCY
LAURA CLARKE
TIMOTHY P. CLELAND
LAUREN L. CLINE
JAVIER J. CONCEPCION
STEVEN W. COTTEN
SARAH E. CRIDER
JONATHAN W. CURME
KATHRYN DEKRAFFT
JOE DELLA ROCCA
ELIZABETH DOWNS
JO EARLY
IRA EDGE
LAURA ELIZABETH EDWARDS
HEATHER S. EGOLF-FOX
KIMBERLY A. ELMORE
AMAL S. ESSADER
PAUL EUDY
KAITLIN M. FAGUE
CHRISTINE E. FAIRCHILD
SHARYN FARNSWORTH
DAN FU
GUIDO C. GABBRIELLI
SAMUEL J. GARVEY
JEFFREY C. GAULDING
MORGAN C. GIDDINGS
ZACHARY S. GILES
FRANCIS GILLIAM
ANNA P. GOLDSTEIN
KIRAN K. GOLI
LAURA J. GUY
YOUSSEF HABIBI
MATTHEW HALEY
ERIC H. HALL
SCOTT J. HARRISON
JENNIFER L. HAWK
AMY E. HENDERSHOT
INGRID C. HOEGER
JASON HOLMES
LIAN HONG
RALPH L. HOUSE
JUI-HUA HSIEH
GANG HU
ZHENG HUANG
STEVEN HULTQUIST
ELIZABETH A. JOHNSON
CHASITY NICOLE JONES
VELVET JOURNIGAN
SHOWYI JU
JONAH W. JURSS
JINHEE KANG
KYUNG MO KANG
MARK A. KEARNS
SANDEEP KEDIA
RICHARD B. KEITHLEY
FIONA R. KIZEWSKI
JOHN LACUZIO
RUBY TANG SUET LAM
KIMBERLY T. LANE
HSIEN-MING LEE
CHANGHOON LEE
EUN-JU LEE
PAUL A. LEELAND
CATHERINE LEPREVOST
XIAOMENG LIU
SHAILESH M. LOPES
DEBORAH LUECKEN
MAN LUO
WEI LUO
JEFFREY MACDONALD
OLGA A. MASS
GREGORY S. MCCARTY
CHARLES J. MCELHINNY
BRENNA E. MCJURY
JENNIFER D. MCWILLIAMS
SUSAN MEITZ
ALAN D. MONAGHAN
GRANT S. MURPHY
PUNYA NAVARATNARAJAH
ROB NEWMAN
TIEN M. NGUYEN
JANINE K. NUNES
EMILY A. OBLATH
ANDY J. OMMEN
BRETT PAGE
JERRY M. PARKS
SHREYA PAUL
STEVEN L. PELLIZZERI
NICK F. PELZ
MARIA S. PERESIN
JELENA PETROVIC
LEAH A. PRANGER
MIALY F. RAMAROSON
BALAJI RAO
SIDDHARTHA RAY CHAUDHURI
MATTHEW R. REDINBO
JUSTIN RICHARDS
JASON M. ROCHETTE
ALISSA M. ROLAND
GINGER ROTHROCK
SCOTT J. SAUER
IRIS V. SCHERER
CHRISTIE A. SCHULTE
LEIF SEDERHOLT
MARIAM SHAMSZAD
WOO SUB SHIM
SUSAN K. SHUPING
DEUSANILDE J. SILVA
SIDNEY A. SIMON
KWAN SKINNER
EMILIE D. SMITH
JOANA P. SOARES
JING SONG
KELLEY L. SPENCE
TODD J. SPROUSE
BRYAN J. STACHURA
TINA E. STACY
NATHAN A. STASKO
DERRICK R. STEVENS
AMANDA L. STEWART
RANDY B. STOCKBRIDGE
ASHLEY M. STOKES
CHRISTIE L. STRAHLER
SARAH S. SUBARAN
JAMES A. SWENBERG
HAO TANG
OAS G. TERRENCE
DAVID J. THOMAS
BENTON E. THOMAS
AMANDA THOMPSON
NATALIE J. THOMPSON
KRISTINA L. TOUPS
KELLY R. URNESS
JORGE VASQUEZ-KOOL
KARNEL R. WALKER
BRET D. WALLACE
PAUL L. WALSH
JUNWEI WANG
SARAH E. WENGRYNIUK
BRITTANY C. WESTLAKE
PHILIP S. WILLIAMS
HUBERT WINSTON
DEREK WOLFE
MELVIN T. WOODLAND
SHUTING WU
SHENGQIANG XIAO
S. STANLEY YOUNG
JOSEPHINE YUEN
XIANCHENG ZENG
YING ZHANG
GUIYU ZHAO
JUSTIN O. ZOPPE
JOSEPH L. ZUCCARELLO
ALEXANDER BALAEFF
DAVID BERUBE
WILLIAM D. BUSH
JASON CARLESKI
MATTHEW COOPER CROWE
MATTHEW CUELLAR
JUAN CUEVA
JOSEPH D. DESOUSA
MANISH DHAWAN
KEVIN DOYLE
WAYNE FREDERICK
KYOKO N. GOTO
JOSHUA T. GUSKE
STEPHANIE E. HOOPER
KAORU IKUMA
MUTHUKUMARASAMY KARTHIKEYAN
PATRICE LEAHY
ANDREW L. MCIVER
TERRIE L. MOORE
MAURICIO QUIROS
ABHISHEK SINGH
BLAKE T. SLOAN
RON A. TRAUD
PETER B. UTHE
SANFORD J. WADDELL
BRETT D. WEED
YAROSLAVA G. YINGLING
ZHIBIN ZHANG
LEON J. DEMBY
JENNIFER C. FREEMAN
JOHN D. GIPSON
JIHUI GUO
KRISTIN A. HAYDEN
HAO LI
KAI LI
SUMMER MAFFETT
CHRISTINE O. ROBICHAUD
FATIN SAMARA
ALLISON A. SCHMITT
RAVINDRA VENKATRAMANI
JIN WANG
KRISTEN WILKINS
RACHEL M. WITEK
IRINA R. BOGDANOVA
PEILING CHEN
VIJAY GUPTA
SUMITH R. KOTTEGODA
KIMBERLY MAYER
GAYATHRI VASUDEVAN
CEVDET AKBAY
VENKATA G. CHADA
JERRY EBALUNODE
KATER D. HAKE
SANG HOON JOO
KRZYSZTOF A. KRAJEWSKI
RAMA K. PIDAPARTHI
VALENTINE ST HILAIRE
JASON C. VALENTINE
LIN YE
NATHAN I. CHUTAS
ANN M. DECKER
WESLEY A. HENDERSON
SUNG HEE JOO
LAURENT D. MENARD
HAMED SHADPOUR
MIN WU
ZACKARY I. CLEVELAND
JOSHUA S. GRIMLEY
CHRISTOPHER C. HARRELL
HEILEEN HSU-KIM
BORIS LAU
RICHARD LUDWIG
JESSICA L. REINER
DANUTA E. GROMEK WOODS
SUSANNE M. MIRANDA
RACHEL B. SMITH
J. R. ARNOLD
BRANDON J. TURUNEN
JOSEPH L. WHITE
TOMAS T. DING
YELENA FAYVILEVICH
MELANIE A. PRIESTMAN
ANDREW WOLTERS
LIANJIE CURTIS CUI
JASON R. KREIDER
MICHAEL C. LAUFERSWEILER
RON NICEWANDER
LILLI A. WOLF-GOUVEIA
BRIAN T. HILL
XIAOYUAN CUI
BERNADETTE GALE
CASIMIR RYZEWSKI
CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM WEST
PHILIP DANIEL FLOYD
FIONA J. FORBES
HEIDI MARTELOCK
ARUNA SAMBANDAM
ALAN LETTON
DAVID CHARLES DAYTON
CHARLES THOMAS LEVEY
STEPHEN C. BEALE
JINGFAN HUANG
TAI-NANG HUANG
RUSSELL J. JACOBS
DENISE K. MAC MILLAN
MICHAEL JOSEPH THERIEN
SYLVIA ANNE EDGERTON
DAVID E. KNOX
JEFFREY STEVEN CARTER
GEORGE EDWARD WHITWELL
MICHAEL R. PAVIA
SCOTT JAMES FRITSCHEL
LOUISE MARSH PARISER
JOHN L. PRZYBYLINSKI
JAMES CHARLES BRAY
RICHARD ELLIOTT L. HENDERSON
ROBERT K. PINSCHMIDT
RALPH MARTIN POLLACK
JOHN A. GARDINER
JAMES E. KURZ
ZOLTAN NAGY
RONALD NATIONS
RUDOLPH PARISER
KENNETH C. WALDO
LOUIS DUBOSE QUIN
JAMES H. BOOTHE
EUGENE E. HOWE
MACLEAN J. BABCOCK

Volunteer Opportunity for the NC ACS Local Section

NC ACS Local Section is Seeking a Highly Motivated Individual to Serve as the Marketing/Advertising Director.

The NC ACS Executive Committee (EC) seeks a marketing/advertising director to assist the EC in various activities. This is a volunteer position, as are all roles in the EC. Marketing efforts will be useful to the NC ACS in improving the visibility of the NC ACS in the local community and in increasing attendance at NC ACS events. Specific NC ACS activities for which the NC ACS seeks marketing expertise include, but are not limited to: boosting NC ACS membership; fostering an increase in student members; and encouraging attendance at the several events presented each year by the NC ACS. These events currently include a major meeting that features a Distinguished Lecture and Award; and one or more smaller meetings typically including dinner, cocktails and an entertaining speaker. Several times each year, the NC ACS electronically publishes a newsletter, "The TarHelium", to its membership. Advertising efforts, including sales of ad space in the TarHelium, will assist NC ACS in raising funds for its activities. The EC holds monthly meetings to address NC ACS business, which the marketing/advertising director will be encouraged to attend. Anyone having an interest in this position is invited to contact

    Jay Brown
    2008 NC ACS Chair

to discuss this volunteer opportunity.


DOES ACS HAVE YOUR CURRENT CONTACT INFORMATION?

It is extremely important to keep ACS informed of your current contact information. If you have had a change in your address, phone number, or email address, please contact ACS to update your information. In addition to your old and new contact information, include your membership ID, which is the 8-digit number in the upper left hand corner of the C&E News address label when you correspond with ACS.

Postal mail:
Manager, Member & Subscriber Services, ACS
P.O. Box 337
Columbus, OH 43210

Telephone:
(800) 333-9511
(614) 447-3776

E-mail:
service@acs.org


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

VOTING MEMBERS
J. Brown
(Brown Law Office), Chair-�08
522-0312jaybrownlaw@gmail.com
J. Hines
(RTI), Chair-Elect-�08
541-6647hines@rti.org
M. Pasquinelli
(NSCU), Secretary �08-'09
515-9426melissa_pasquinelli@ncsu.edu
J. T. Bursey(NCBA at EPA)
Treasurer �07-�09
493-3025joanmhb@aol.com
N. S. Tulve
(EPA), TH Editor �06-present
541-1077tulve.nicolle@epa.gov
B. N. Chaney
(AzoPharma), Councilor, �08-�10
  
J. L. Chao
(IBM), Councilor, '06-'08
  
A. L. Crumbliss
(Duke), Councilor �07-�09
660-1540alc@chem.duke.edu
S. Paisner
(Lord), Councilor, �08-�10
469-2500
(ext.2490)
sara_paisner@lord.com
L. Sremaniak
(NCSU), Councilor, '08-'10
515-2937lssreman@pams.ncsu.edu
R. A. Palmer
(Duke), Councilor �07-�09
660-1539rap@chem.duke.edu
R. Gorga
(NCSU), Alt. Councilor �06-�08
  
K. E. Levine
(RTI), Alt. Councilor, �08-�10
541-8886levine@rti.org
K. Lyle
(Duke), Alt. Councilor, �07-�09
660-1621kenneth.lyle@duke.edu
N. Oberlies
(RTI), Alt. Councilor, '07-'09
541-6958oberlies@rti.org
K. Tomer
(NIEHS), Alt. Councilor, �08-�10
541-1966tomer@niehs.nih.gov
A. Tonelli
(NCSU), Chair �07,
Alt. Coun.�08-�10
515-6588alan_tonelli@ncsu.edu
C. Goss
(GSK), Past Chair '06
483-9755charles.a.goss@gsk.com
S. Levine
(NCSU, Ret.), Past Chair '05
453-2653naturpix@mindspring.com
NON-VOTING MEMBERS
M. Box
(Duke), Webmaster
  
M. M. Bursey
(UNC), Ex Officio
493-3025mauricebursey@aol.com
K. A. Cutler
(NCCU), Project Seed Ex Officio
530-6172kcutler@wpo.nccu.edu
E. L. Eliel
(UNC), Ex Officio
962-6198eliel@email.unc.edu
A Davis
(DPI LLC), TCDG, Ex Officio
  
T. M. O'Connell
(UNC), TMRDG, Ex Officio
483-1535 
M. Fitzgerald
(Duke), TAMS, Ex Officio
  
E. C. Bigham
Retired, Director, District IV
  
 

Updated: August 28, 2008

North Carolina Section of the American Chemical Society
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